16
Feb
14

Life Saving Bariatric Surgery in Los Angeles

Obesity has many health risks associated with it. High level of the bad cholesterol (LDL), low levels of the good cholesterol (HDL) triglycerides increases abnormal blood fats.These blood fats increases the risk of coronary heart disease from the plaque, a waxy material that restrict blood flow inside life giving coronary arteries to the heart. A restriction or blockage of blood getting to the heart results in failure. The plaque in arteries can also create a blood clot to form and restrict blood flow to the brain resulting in stroke. Obesity impacts the way a body processes sugar making the level too high. Energy comes from a insulin hormone interacting with sugar. With improper levels the insulin hormone does not react properly with sugar. This is called Type 2 diabetes which is the leading cause of early death, coronary heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and eye health.The majority of type 2 diabetes patients are obese. Obesity also is considered a cause to cancer, sleep apnea, poor breathing, and gallstones.

Bariatric surgery is not a first option for weight loss. The invasive surgery has the risk of any surgery. Following the surgery is a recovery process that is long term due to the initial obesity of the patient.The slower metabolism results in a long recovery process. Initial efforts for weight loss is a proactive diet and exercise regimen. Obese patients are referred to a nutritionist to evaluate eating habits and to form new healthy habits. The nutrition specialists support changes needed for weight loss and foods affecting type 2 diabetes. A health and wellness fitness specialist work on programs to increase metabolism to eliminate weight loss. The exercises in a clinical fitness gym are mostly low impact cardiovascular exercises.The weight for obesity create joint pain that would be more pronounced with running. Effective exercises include using a treadmill, stretching exercises. The patient is advised to continue a physical health regimen at home by walking and using stairs. For certain obesity related conditions like glucose tolerance and severe hypertension, the diet and exercise program may not be as effective in managing weight loss. After a formal weight loss evaluation, bariatric surgery in Los Angeles may be the only option for weight loss.

Bariatric surgery in Los Angeles is a weight loss surgery performed on obese people. The procedure is performed on the stomach and small intestine. One method is to reduce the stomach size with a gastric band making the patient less likely to eat as much food as before. Another method to reduce the size of the stomach is the surgical removal of a portion of the stomach. Gastric bypass surgery creates pouches in the stomach that are bypassed to the small intestine. Food is rerouted to waste rather than absorption by the small intestine. Gastric bypass surgery limits hunger with a smaller stomach pouch and food that is taken is less likely to be absorbed. This type of surgery is for morbidly obese patient. The fat that surrounds the heart, neck supporting breathing, and causing type 2 diabetes is so severe that surgery is necessary to reduce the immediate health risks. Gastric bypass surgery is the most invasive bariatric surgery. It is also the most proactive supporting urgent care resulting in necessary weight loss.

Following bariatric surgery, the post recovery that includes watching for infections, blood clots, and pneumonia. The stomach is observed closely for leakage. Complications may happen later so many follow up appointments are scheduled after surgery. The development of hernia or bowel obstruction can occur. The process of Gastric bypass surgery performed by Los Angeles doctors include the post-surgery visits to eliminate any complications. After recovery, the therapy returns to the diet and exercise regimen that occurred before surgery that served as a first weight loss choice before the bariatric procedure.

This article was originally posted on travelerstoday.com

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